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Is CBD Oil Good For Motion Sickness?

By 17/01/2023CBD Oil UK
herb40 cbd oil - Is CBD Oil Good For Motion Sickness

Say Goodbye to Motion Sickness: Discover the Power of CBD Oil for Relief on Your Next Trip

Motion sickness is a common problem that affects many people while traveling or boating. It can make travel uncomfortable and difficult, but there are ways to alleviate the symptoms. One of the most promising options is CBD oil, which can help reduce motion sickness by acting on the nausea centre in the brainstem. In this article, we will explore the causes of motion sickness, the ways CBD can help, and how to use it effectively.

CBD for Motion Sickness: How it Works

CBD is a medicinal compound extracted from the cannabis plant that has been shown to be effective in reducing the symptoms of motion sickness. It enhances the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in processes such as nausea and vomiting. Studies in animals have found that the endocannabinoid system is directly correlated with the region in the brain responsible for regulating nausea and vomiting.

Drug companies have manufactured compounds that block the endocannabinoid (CB1) receptors in the brain. They recently tested one drug as a potential weight loss medication. Although it did help patients lose some weight, it also made them excessively nauseous. This study provides evidence that the endocannabinoid system regulates the brain’s nausea and vomiting centre.

The endocannabinoid system is thought to connect the physical and emotional relationship between the gut and brain, leading researchers to believe that CBD may provide relief from nausea caused by stress and gut infections. CBD optimises the endocannabinoid system by protecting anandamide levels – one of the primary endocannabinoids involved in regulating the nausea centre in the brain.

A Guide to Using CBD for Motion Sickness

CBD is an excellent option for preventing or managing motion sickness because it works on multiple causes of the disorder at the same time. It inhibits an enzyme known as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which is responsible for breaking down our endocannabinoids. By blocking this enzyme, we can increase anandamide levels in the brain.

Anandamide activates the endocannabinoid receptors in the nausea centre of the brain to alleviate symptoms of motion sickness. CBD has the added benefit of keeping the SNS from going haywire. This has the compound advantage of relieving nausea and anxiety, which are closely related and often strike at the same time.

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Dosage

The first step to treating motion sickness with CBD is to determine the starting dosage. This varies from one person to the next, so it’s important to do some trial and error before locking down a particular daily dose. Most research involving CBD for motion sickness uses the supplement at high doses. Whether or not we need high doses for the compound to work is still up for debate.

Many people find relief at doses in the medium strength range, though you may need to try different doses until you find what works for you. We recommend starting at the smallest dose according to your weight and increasing gradually until you find the relief you need. The medium strength dose seems to work well for reducing motion sickness in many people.

For best results, take CBD before the motion sickness starts. This can be difficult to predict, but if you frequently experience symptoms on a boat or plane, try taking the CBD dose an hour or so before your scheduled trip.

Conclusion

Motion sickness is a common problem that can make travel difficult and uncomfortable. CBD oil is an effective option for reducing the symptoms of motion sickness by acting on the nausea centre in the brainstem. By optimising the endocannabinoid system, CBD can help alleviate nausea caused by stress and gut infections. The dosage of CBD for motion sickness can vary from person to person, so it’s important to try different doses until you find what

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Farhad K

Farhad K considers himself to be an ambassador of self-love and has a mission to make people feel better.

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